Showing 105 results

Archival description
Advanced search options
Print preview Hierarchy View:

Christmas card designed for Industry Year, depicts 'The Extraction of Metals' a wood engraving from the Cosmographia Universalis (1582) of Sebastion Munster

The aim of Industry Year is to encourage a better understanding of industry, its essential role and its service to the community. Its purpose will also be to foster the pride of those who work in industry in their own achievement and contribution throughout the world for the provision of food, shelter and warmth; for the care of the sick, old and handicapped; for a better quality of life for the individual and for the community as a whole. 35,147 copies sold.

Christmas card entitled 'Hodie Christus Natus Est' by Janne Solvang

Janne Solvang won an RSA Student Design Award in 1994 for her design to promote the Byzantine Art exhibition at the British Museum. She was asked by the RSA to design a Christmas card that would convey a rich and celebratory atmosphere reiniscent of her project work for the British Museum. The RSA Student Design Awards scheme aims to bridge the gap between education and industry. Each year around 3000 students enter the scheme which is supported by over 100 companies. 76,000 copies sold.

Christmas card entitled 'Home for Christmas' from a coloured woodcut by Edward A Wilson (1886-1970)

Produced for 'Iron Men and Wooden Ships' published by Doubleday, 1924. Reproduced by kind permission of Mrs Perry Wilson Anthony. Edward Wilson was a fellow of the Society and a prolific illustrator. He was born in Glasgow but emigrated to the United States where he worked first as a painter and engraver in Chicago and New York. He also studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and under Howard Pyle at Wilmington. 12,000 copies sold

Christmas card of a basket of Tropical Fruits

Illustration taken from 'Sketches Towards a Hortus Botanicus Americanus...of New and Valuable Plants of the West Indies and North and South America' by W J Titford MD Corresponding member of the Society of Arts, 1812. The Society encouraged the development of the Botanic Garden at St Vincent, where Captain William Bligh left some tropical fruits, including breadfruit for which he was awarded the Society gold medal in 1794.

Christmas card of 'A Grecian Harvest Home' by James Barry

Second painting in a series entitled 'The Progress of Human Knowledge and Culture', displayed in the Great Room. This picture commemorates the votive rites 'established by the doctrinal songs of Orpheus. Barry describes the scene as follows 'In the foreground are young men and women dancing round a double terminal figure of Sylvanus and Pan, the former with his lap filled with the fruits of the earth...in the other corner is...a group of inferior rustics...less amiable, more disorderly, and mean...Inthe top of the picture, Ceres, Bacchus, Pan &c., are looking down with benignity and satisfaction, on the innocent festivity of their happy votaries, behind them is a limb of the zodiac, with the signs of Leo, Virgo and Libra, which mark this season of the year. In the distance is a farm house, binding corn, bees &c., male and female employments, courtships, marriage and a number of little children...' an unstated analogy between the birth of the ancient Greek religion and Christianity, in which we can see the child playing with a bird on a string as the infant Jesus, his mother as Mary and companion as the Baptist, makes this painting of especial significance at Christmas time. 20,200 copies sold.

Christmas card of 'A Grecian Harvest Home' by James Barry

Second painting in a series entitled 'The Progress of Human Knowledge and Culture', displayed in the Great Room. This picture commemorates the votive rites 'established by the doctrinal songs of Orpheus. Barry describes the scene as follows 'In the foreground are young men and women dancing round a double terminal figure of Sylvanus and Pan, the former with his lap filled with the fruits of the earth...in the other corner is...a group of inferior rustics...less amiable, more disorderly, and mean...Inthe top of the picture, Ceres, Bacchus, Pan &c., are looking down with benignity and satisfaction, on the innocent festivity of their happy votaries, behind them is a limb of the zodiac, with the signs of Leo, Virgo and Libra, which mark this season of the year. In the distance is a farm house, binding corn, bees &c., male and female employments, courtships, marriage and a number of little children...' an unstated analogy between the birth of the ancient Greek religion and Christianity, in which we can see the child playing with a bird on a string as the infant Jesus, his mother as Mary and companion as the Baptist, makes this painting of especial significance at Christmas time. 25,123 copies sold.

Christmas card of a painting of Charles Dickens by Anna Zinkeisen, recalling an occasion in December 1850 when, as a Vice President, the novelist came to the Society's House to preside at a meeting

On 18th December 1850, Charles Dickens, Vice President, in the Chair, Mr W Bridges Adams read his paper on Railway Influence and Extension. The Adelphi had been an area of mystery for Charles Dickens in his unhappy childhood and David Copperfield, in the same predicament, would wander about the district, finding excitement in the strange inhabitants of the riverside. In the foreground of the painting Dickens is surrounded by his characters and in the background he can be seen arriving at the Society. 31,000 copies sold.

Christmas card of a Red Amaryllis

The illustration of the Red Amaryllis appears in the fifth volume of the Transactions of the Horticultural Society, presented to the Society in 1824. From its foundation in 1754 the RSA took a strong interest in plants and planting, ranging from its major tree planting campaign in the 18th century; improvement of land for planting; production of food crops for both man and beast, such as potatoes, carrots, apples etc.; to medicinal plants such as opium and rhubarb. The Society also encourage the development of botanical gardens in Britain's colonies to raise viable plants, including spices, for transportation between the colonies and the United Kingdom. in recent time the Amaryllis has become a popular Christmas gift, flowering in the months thereafter. 9,680 copies sold

Christmas card of 'A Tropical Bird on a Tree Stump', 1776 by Robert Lawrie

Taken from a rare mezzotint from the Society's collection. At 20 years of age Lawrie received a bounty of 30 guineas in 1776 from the Society for 'disclosing his method of printing mezzotint in colour'. Lawrie copied the bird form one brought back by Captain Cook in the previous year at the conclusion of his second great voyage of discovery.

Christmas card of a variegated parakeet, from 'Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae or Parrots' by Edward Lear (1812-1888), published in 1832

The volume of prints from which this image is taken has been in the possession of the Society since it was first published. The Society is listed among the subscribers to the work, which would have been of particular relevance given its longstanding interest in printing (it regularly gave prizes for good examples of this craft). In a letter dated 13 March 1833, Lear wrote :'I have received from the Society a sheet of transferring lithographic paper, desiring my opinion of its suitableness for that purpose, and had I been at all accustomed to practice transferring, I should have felt very glad to have given it. As however I understand nothing of that part of the art of Lithography I have taken it to Mr Hullmandel.' Charles Hullmandel, the printer of 'Illustrations', received a silver medal from the Society in 1819 'for a lithographic drawing'. Lear was given permission to draw from life the parrots belonging to the Zoological Society of London. 18,000 copies sold.

Christmas card of a view of Arlington Row, Bibury, Gloucestershire reproduced from a water-colour by Sir Brian Batsford, a Vice-President of the Society

Arlington Row dates from the 14th century, originally bult as a wool store it was converted into cottages for weavers in the 17th century. Arlington Row was rescued by the Society during its campaign for the Preservation of Ancient Cottages. In 1927 the owner of the Bibury cottages, unable to keep them, and their beautiful slate roofs, in repair, offered them to the Society for a comparatively small sum. Much more help was needed to repair them but the money was raised through a subscription fund headed by an American James Hazen Hyde. The donor's conditions that the rents should not be raised and that the exisitng tenants remain undisturbed were faithfully kept and in Septmeber 1930 the cottages, fully restored under the direction of Mr P Morley Horder, were formally handed over to the keeping of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Trust. In 1949 the property was made over to the National Trust. Speaking at the Annual General Meeting of the campaign in 1929, G K Chesterton described the Society's attitude in saving such ancient dwellings: 'Look, here is a definite creation of man made under more normal, more dignified and more sane social conditions. It is like a Greek temple surviving in an age of barbarians.... This belongs to the history of humanity' Image of the tablet erected by the Society on reverse of card. 59,250 copies sold.

Christmas card of a view of Chiddingstone, Kent, from a water-colour by Sir Brian Batsford, a Vice-President of the Society

This row of cottages facing St. Mary's Church was restored in 1953-54 by means of a grant made by the Society to the owners, the National Trust. The work used up the balance of the Fund for the Preservation of Ancient Cottages which the Society established after a national campaign in the 1920s and which came to the aid of notable groups of vernacular buildings in various parts of the country. The timber framed Chiddingstone cottages, some of them tile-hung, others partly of brick, date from the 16th and 17th centuries. 80,725 copies sold

Christmas card of a view of the British Nave of the Great Exhibition of 1851

Taken from Dickinson's 'Pictures of the Great Exhibition 1851', a copy of which is held in the RSA archive. Scene shows the revolving lighthouse in the foreground and further back the Ross telescope. The idea of the exhibition originated with members of the then Society of Arts, including Francis Whishaw, Secretary from 1843 to 1845 and Henry Cole. Both were involved in the planning of the exhibition and the concept was championed by Prince Albert, then President of the Society. It was largely his influence which led to government backing for the exhibition as an international event. As such it became too large for the Society to be directly involved and responsibility passed to a Royal Commission. 28,000 copies sold.

Results 1 to 20 of 105